Applications to Run for Indiana Corn Growers Association Board Due July 30


INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. (June 29, 2017) — Indiana corn farmers who want their voice heard concerning policy issues facing Indiana’s corn industry are encouraged to apply to run for the Indiana Corn Growers Association. The ICGA board advocates for Indiana corn farmers on local, state and federal levels.

ICGA’s districts match the nine Congressional districts across the state. The board of directors is currently looking to fill seats in three of its districts. This year, elections take place in Districts 1, 4 and 7.
 
“Decisions about agriculture often fall into the hands of those who have little understanding of how laws and policies impact Indiana’s farms,” says Ralph Kauffman, chair of the ICGA governance committee and farmer from Atlanta, Ind. “Serving on the ICGA board offers farmers the opportunity to work together and engage key-decision makers who play a role in shaping legislation and policy. By joining together through ICGA, we can help our leaders understand our role in the livelihood of our communities, state and country.”
 
To be eligible to run in the ICGA election, candidates must be an ICGA member in good standing; a producer of corn as an owner, manager or operator; a resident of the district they seek to represent; and current on their ICGA membership dues.
           
Elections will be held during ICGA’s annual meeting in November 2017.
           
For more information on the elections and to download an application, visit www.incorn.org/ICGAelections. Completed applications are due to ICGA on July 30, 2017.
 
For more information, contact Hannah Vorsilak at 317-644-2791 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .
 
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The ICGA board, which works with the state and federal governments to develop and promote sound policies that benefit Indiana corn farmers, consists of nine farmer-directors who provide leadership to the organization on behalf of the 600 ICGA members statewide.
 
This communications was NOT funded with Indiana corn checkoff dollars.
 

The Indiana corn checkoff, administered by Indiana Corn Marketing Council, was first established in 2001. In July 2007, following a vote by the Indiana General Assembly, a new corn checkoff program went into effect to manage funds collected at the first point of sale. Updates to the corn checkoff law were made by the Indiana General Assembly in 2012.

In compliance with Indiana law, a checkoff assessment of ½-cent ($0.005) shall be collected on each bushel of corn marketed in the state of Indiana.

The checkoff requirements do not apply to popcorn, seed corn or sweet corn. There is a right to refund within the law for those who choose not to support the corn checkoff program. To refund, a farmer must fill out the refund form and return to Indiana Corn Marketing Council.

Recently, ICMC launched our First Purchaser Portal. This will allow you to electronically file your quarterly remittance numbers and download a completed remittance form to send directly to ICMC with your payment.

Once you are registered (you should have received your unique registration code in the mail) and logged into your account, you can review invoices due and electronically file your quarterly report. For payment, you can download the completed form and mail it to:

Indiana Corn Marketing Council

P.O. Box 80513

Indianapolis, IN 46280-0513 

If you have any questions, please contact Dennis Henry at 317-614-0117 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

To visit the portal, click here.

RFSBanner

The EPA is attacking Indiana farmers!
Stand up for farmers today.

The Environmental Protection Agency has proposed to set the renewable volume obligation (RVO) annual target for corn-based ethanol below the amount set by Congress in the nation’s Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). The 2017 RVO standard as proposed by EPA, 14.8 billion gallons instead of 15 billion gallons, effectively cuts corn usage by 71.4 million bushels.

The Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) is the federal law that helps get domestic, renewable, cleaner-burning corn ethanol blended in the nation’s fuel supply.

This cut in required volumes will have a devastating effect on farmers and rural communities here in Indiana and across the country at a time when corn is in abundant supply and corn prices are hovering near the cost of production. This loss is equivalent to suspending all of our corn exports to Taiwan, one of our largest customers.

American farmers produced a near record 13.6 billion bushels last year, according to USDA and another large crop is emerging across the nation. As a result, corn prices hover near break-even levels. In such precarious times, we can ill afford to derail a market for 71.4 million bushels of demand equivalent to nearly $271 million in revenue. 

We’re growing more than enough corn to meet all needs. There’s no need to change something that works. The RFS has reduced greenhouse gas emissions, decreased our reliance on foreign oil, lowered gasoline prices for consumers, increased economic stability in rural America and spurred innovation in advanced and cellulosic biofuels.

Comment by the July 11, 2016 deadline to help save this market equivalent to 425,000 acres of corn. 

Please contact the EPA today to tell them how much harm this proposal is causing your farm and your community.  

Farmers comment here.

Consumers comment here. 

 


 

What does Ethanol Mean to Indiana? 


Indiana farmers grew the corn to help produce almost 1 billion gallons of ethanol in 2015. Indiana ranks fourth in the nation in ethanol production capacity. Ethanol production boosts the economy by creating over 500 jobs directly in ethanol plants, and over 4,100 indirect jobs. Indiana’s ethanol industry contributes over $3.6 billion in total economic activity and revenue for the state. Read the full study here.

What does Ethanol Mean to Indiana Farmers? 


Indiana’s ethanol industry has increased cropland prices an average of $52.50 per acre, resulting in a $635 million increase in land value appreciation, providing equity for farmers and rural residents. Ethanol has grown demand for corn, stabilizing prices and boosting farmer income.

Indiana corn farmers are committed to supporting our state’s ethanol industry and recently partnered with the Indiana Office of Energy Development and others to encourage fuel retailers across the state to add blender pumps to give drivers more access to ethanol-blended fuels through a cash-match USDA grant.

What does Ethanol Mean to Indiana Consumers?


Indiana consumed 314 million gallons of ethanol in 2013, reducing dependence on foreign oil. All across the state, E85 can be found 30-80 cents per gallon cheaper than regular gasoline.

Like ICGA on Facebook: www.facebook.com/indianacorngrowers


Follow ICGA on Twitter: www.twitter.com/IN_Corn

 

Indiana Corn Growers Association Seeks Candidates for Board of Directors

 
INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. (July 18, 2014) — In today’s world, many of the decisions affecting how our farms are managed are being made at the Statehouse, in Congress and by regulatory agencies. This makes the role Indiana Corn Growers Association plays even more critical for the state’s corn farmers.
 
To reflect the growing importance of staying connected to what is happening at a Congressional district level, the ICGA Board of Directors recently approved changing its districts to align with the nine Indiana congressional districts. The board is currently seeking farmer-members to become candidates to fill one seat from each of the new districts.
 
“Too many decisions about how we farm today are not being made behind the wheel of a tractor, but in offices hundreds, or even thousands, of miles away by people who may know very little about agriculture and the impacts their decisions have on our farms,” said Herb Ringel, ICGA president and farmer from Wabash, Ind. “Having representation from each congressional district across the state will help us be more effective when reaching out to our legislators about issues important to their constituents back home.”  
 
To be eligible to run in the ICGA election, candidates must be an ICGA member in good standing; a producer of corn as an owner, manager or operator; a resident of the district they seek to represent; and current on their ICGA membership dues.   
 
One farmer from each congressional district will be elected during ICGA’s annual meeting in December 2014.           
 
“This is your opportunity to help shape the work ICGA does on your behalf,” said Ringel. “Is there current or proposed legislation out there that worries you? Does your representative – both at the state and federal level – know how their votes affect you and your ability to farm? This is your chance to take action on those concerns.”
 
For more information on the elections and to download an application, visit www.incorn.org/ICGAelections. Completed applications are due to ICGA on Friday, August 22, 2014.
 
For more information, contact Hannah Brescher at 317-644-2791 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .
 
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Contact: Megan Kuhn, 317-614-0377, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
The ICGA board, which works with the state and federal governments to develop and promote sound policies that benefit Indiana corn farmers, consists of 15 farmer-directors who provide leadership to the organization on behalf of the nearly 600 ICGA members statewide 
 
This communication was NOT funded with Indiana corn checkoff dollars.

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